wnol.info February 19 2018


Bogus tsunami alert for United States east coast following test 'glitch'

February 19 2018, 07:50 | Irvin Gilbert

NWS SOURCE NWS

NWS									SOURCE NWS

"Some users may have received notifications that a tsunami warning is in effect for their area".

"The alert that popped up on people's phones did not mention it was only a test, though clicking the alert took users to Accuweather's website, which states: "...

A tsunami warning test message had many people panicked Tuesday morning. Even AccuWeather has said now that the warning was a test but it didn't explain why its app had pushed it out as a genuine alert earlier today.

Katia De Negro, who received the tsunami alert in Manhattan, told Sky News: "My reaction was definitely of surprise". But it was sent out as an alert.

"It's not routine, it's not part of the test", said Lance Frank, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, New Jersey. "We do tsunami alert testing every month, and it was the same message that went out every month". "We will update you when we find out more", the tweet said. Some recipients of the message posted images of it on social media, with some showing the alert in the AccuWeather app. "Repeat, a Tsunami Warning is not in effect #chswx #gawx #savwx #scwx", the NWS in Charleston, South Carolina, wrote.

The word "TEST" was in the header of the message, but the private forecaster said it passes along weather service warnings based on a computer scan of codes.

In January, a false alarm from Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency warning residents about an incoming ballistic missile was left uncorrected for almost 40 minutes.

This tsunami warning comes after an employee at the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency mistakenly sent a missile alert on behalf of the state last month. He said that after clicking on the push notification for details he realised it was just a test. Problems in the alert system allowed it to remain in place for almost 40 minutes. The weather service typically issues a live warning, which is then disseminated by private companies and received by subscribers.



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