wnol.info November 22 2017


Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

November 22 2017, 01:47 | Guillermo Bowen

Facebook Wants You To Upload Nudes Of Yourself To Stop Revenge Porn

Facebook anti-revenge porn program asks users for their nude photos

But apparently the reason why Facebook wants your nude photo is technically sound.

If users are anxious their images will end up plastered all over Instagram or Facebook, the e-Safety commissioner will tell them to send the images to themselves on Facebook Messenger.

The Australian Office of the eSafety Commissioner announced they were partnering with the social media giant last week on a pilot scheme that will allow anyone to report sensitive images being shared online without their permission.

It is Grant who revealed the details of Facebook plan to ABC news channel in Australia.

Facebook is testing a new system to combat users posting intimate photos of their former significant others for revenge.

Others, however, have expressed serious concerns about the amount of trust the system requires users to put in Facebook.

Revenge porn is one trend taking over social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram - and definitely one we hope stays in 2017.

However, the trial won't completely solve Australia's revenge porn woes, Clare McGlynn, an expert from Durham Law School, told BBC.

Facebook, being the most prominent social network on the web, has developed tools to prevent such content from spreading and get removed as soon as possible.

"So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded", she claimed. Facebook then builds a "hash" of the image, meaning it creates a unique fingerprint for the file.

The way it works is simple: You send yourself the image using Messenger, then Facebook converts it into an identifiable code, which it uses to block attempts to upload the same picture to any of its services. Users then send the posts to themselves over Facebook's Messenger app. "It is quite counterintuitive to send such intimate images to an unknown recipient and Facebook will need to be able to reassure people that they have the right measures in place to protect them", Whiston-Dew added.

Facebook says it is not storing the photos, just the hashes of the photos.

More fundamentally, though, asking women who have been victims to upload naked photos of themselves is a rather tone-deaf approach, one that's not particularly trauma-informed.



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