wnol.info November 22 2017


Law enforcement, safety groups remind teens to stay safe behind the wheel

November 22 2017, 01:37 | Irvin Gilbert

A teenager in a car

A teenager in a car

Teen Driver Safety Week will help parents focus attention on setting rules for their teen driver before allowing them to get behind the wheel.

Across the United States, motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teenagers.

AAA said 75-percent of nighttime crashes involving teen drivers happen between 9 p.m. and midnight. Parents can reduce the unsafe and sometimes deadly behaviors, such as alcohol consumption, driving without seat belts, speeding, carrying extra passengers, and driving distracted. He says those two create a recipe for a traffic accident.

The Bakersfield Police Department does have programs put in place to help keep teen drivers as safe as possible when they're behind the wheel.

34 percent wish they'd learned more about handling distractions while driving.

According to traffic safety groups, distracted driving amongst teens is a much greater problem than previously thought. "It will take a holistic approach that combines education, experiential learning, and enforcement to change the driving culture to one that is distraction-free".

THE number of driving deaths among IL teens has dropped by half since the state instituted stricter guidelines for earning a driver's license almost a decade ago. Despite not being legally allowed to buy alcohol, nearly one out of five teen drivers involved in fatal crashes had been drinking, according to 2015 data from the NHTSA. The challenge coincides with the beginning of National Teen Driver Safety week, and all schools entered in the challenge must complete their campaigns by November 15.

"Keeping a cool head on the road starts with a strategy and a plan -; that's where Michelin's resources for coaching your teen driver can help".

Be a good role model.

Experts attribute teens' heightened risk of involvement in a crash to their overconfidence, inexperience, and an increased likelihood to speed, make mistakes, and get distracted - especially if their friends are in the vehicle. In addition to these worries, getting a speeding ticket (42 percent) running out of gas (37 percent), and their own distracted driving (33 percent) are on teens minds when they get behind the wheel of a auto. Parents and guardians must set firm driving rules to impact their teen's driving behavior. Distracted driving isn't limited to cell phone use; other passengers, audio and climate controls in the vehicle and eating or drinking while driving are all examples of risky distractions for teen drivers. However, with all of these activities, teens tend to compromise something very important: sleep.



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