wnol.info September 24 2017


Tropical Storm Jose Forms in Atlantic

September 24 2017, 01:18 | Irvin Gilbert

Tropical Storm Jose Forms in Atlantic

Tropical Storm Jose looms right behind Hurricane Irma

GOES 16 visible satellite imagery of Hurricane Irma, Sept. 5, 2017.

On the forecast track, the extremely risky core of Irma is forecast to move over portions of the northern Leeward Islands Tuesday night and early Wednesday.

Jose could begin to feel some increasing wind shear partly due to outflow winds aloft from Hurricane Irma, which may put a crimp on its intensification.

A new tropical storm has formed behind Hurricane Irma the Atlantic Ocean.

Hurricane Irma, meanwhile, is approaching the island of Antigua.

Some strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours and Jose could become a hurricane by Friday. A watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds, conditions that make outside preparations hard or risky.

The storm is about 1,505 miles east of the Lesser Antilles, and maximum sustained winds are 40 mph. Exactly where this turn will occur, whether it is west of the Peninsula, east of it, or right up the spine is yet to be determined.

States of emergency have been declared in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, AP reported.

Irma's future, and that of the US coastline, is dependent on two atmospheric features: the Bermuda High and an upper-level low moving west to east through the central U.S.

If the upper-level low catches Irma and shoots it north, the hurricane could parallel the east coast of Florida, similar to the path Hurricane Matthew took in October.

Image captured by GOES 16 satellite on September 5, 2017 of Hurricane Irma with 150 miles per hour winds.

If the system becomes a tropical storm, it would be named Jose.



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