wnol.info September 24 2017


Saudi regime urged to release detained clerics

September 24 2017, 01:21 | Irvin Gilbert

The Qatar Central Bank is effectively bailing the country's economy out as the Saudi-led blockade continues 

The Qatar Central Bank is effectively bailing the country's economy out as the Saudi-led blockade continues 

Both clerics are also seen as opponents of the Saudi royal family.

Reports of the arrests coincided with widespread speculation that King Salman intends to abdicate in favor of Crown Prince Mohammed.

Tehran based Press TV, quoting multiple unidentified sources and tweets by rights organizations, journalists and others; reports that the arrests come at a time when Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud plans to renounce power in favor of his son, Crown Prince Mohammed.

In response to Al-Muraikhi's accusation to Saudi Arabia that it wants to depose the Emir of Qatar and replace him with the foreign minister, Al-Qattan said that Saudi Arabia will never use these cheap methods and it doesn't want to change the regime.

The Arab states have demanded Qatar sever any links with the Brotherhood and other groups they deem to be "terrorists".

Sheikh Salman al-Awdah, an influential cleric who was imprisoned from 1994-99 for agitating for political change and has 14 million followers on Twitter, appears to have been detained over the weekend, the posting suggested.

Moody's said global freight companies have implemented contingency plans to re-route traffic through neutral countries: Maersk announced in June that it would redirect marine traffic destined for Qatar via Oman, running a feeder service from Salalah.

A solution to the recent Persian Gulf crisis was in sight, but soon everything was back to square one and it was revealed that the contact between Saudi and Qatari officials was only in line with Washington's demand aimed at creating a thaw in relations between Riyadh and Doha.

During the call the two sides discussed holding talks to resolve the Qatar crisis.

Qatar is facing regional isolation after Saudi Arabia, UAE, Bahrain plus Egypt cut ties with the small monarchy on June 5.

As tensions rise between Qatar and Saudi Arabia, each side is looking to K Street to win support from the US government.

Initially it was reported that Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani has expressed his willingness to enter into negotiations with the quartet.

Optimism about dialogue between the two states, however, was quickly dashed when Riyadh accused Doha of "distorting facts" and suspended dialogue. Instead, they got into a public spat about who initiated the call, and who wanted it more than the other.

Meanwhile Exiled Saudi opposition activists have called for protests on 15 September meant to galvanize opposition to the royal family. Most protests are held on Fridays because of large congregation gatherings in Muslim countries.

He further criticized what he called Qatar's "historic support" for terrorism and extremist factions.



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