wnol.info October 21 2017


Trump's health care budget means deep cuts for safety net

October 21 2017, 12:01 | Alonzo Simpson

Pool Sipa USA Newscom

Pool  Sipa USA  Newscom

But in a press briefing Tuesday, White House Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said that the proposed budget doesn't touch Social Security retirement or Medicare.

Panel Democrats charged that Trump's cuts would rip apart the social safety net.

Trump budget director Mick Mulvaney insists the administration's spending plans won't cut Medicaid money. Mark Warner, D-Va., told Mulvaney Thursday.

Mulvaney also said the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) scoring of the AHCA distorted numerous facts and figures that Sanders was quoting. "And as a outcome I think it is just disastrously consequential to build a budget on 3% - the bible says you can't build a house on a sandy foundation", Sanford said. What it does is perpetuate a myth that we can go out there and balance the budget without touching entitlements. "This budget relies on absurd economic projections and pretend revenues". These votes can be very politically unpopular, but many business groups have warned that failing to raise the debt ceiling could lead to a financial crisis, because the USA government might not have enough money to pay its bills.

Mulvaney's appearance was one of four slated on Wednesday as Trump Cabinet officials fanned out on Capitol Hill to defend Trump's budget, which contains jarring, politically unrealistic cuts to the social safety net and a broad swath of domestic programs.

"Never before really have I seen such a cruel and morally bankrupt budget".

"It dismantles our nation's basic living standards, which Americans have turned to for decades", she said. Those who work closely with these programs understand how harmful such a budget cut could be.

Carson - who himself grew up in poverty to become a widely acclaimed neurosurgeon - said people with the "right mind set" can have everything taken away from them, and they'll pull themselves up.

The plan also does not slash Meals On Wheels, said Mulvaney. Sen.

"The foundation for the plan is 3 percent growth".

In a May 24 column for Vox, economist and former Obama adviser Jason Furman explained in even more detail why 3 percent economic growth was "extremely unlikely", with a specific focus on the slowing growth of the labor force.

That 50-year-old federal-state partnership has brought improved highways, education and job-training opportunities to Ohio, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Missouri, Mississippi, Pennsylvania and other Appalachian states that Trump carried in the presidential election.

Mulvaney was responding to the deluge of criticism that followed the rollout of President Donald Trump's first full budget proposal earlier this week, even though it faces certain changes in Congress.

And while this is certainly a discouraging development for those hoping the White House is capable of rudimentary governmental competence - $2 trillion isn't exactly a rounding error - what makes this especially fascinating to me is what Trump World is saying now that "the mystery money" problem has been exposed.

The facts are that the proposed budget cuts Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program by $616 billion, food stamp program by $191 billion, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program by $22 billion and Social Security disability benefits by almost $70 billion -- all over the next decade.

"This is an elementary double count". "It provides no real information on "tax reform" other than to claim it is revenue neutral".

Mulvaney defended that gimmick on Tuesday, saying it was done "on goal".

Joel Berg thinks raising the minimum wage would also help, as would making housing more affordable for low-income families. "There's other places where we were probably overly conservative in our accounting".



Other news