wnol.info July 26 2017


Police make two more arrests after Manchester bombing

July 26 2017, 10:34 | Perry Erickson

Britain's Home Secretary Amber Rudd at a vigil for Manchester Blast in Albert Square in Manchester

Manchester Bomber Was'Likely Acting With Others British Minister Amber Rudd

"I spoke to him about five days ago. there was nothing wrong, everything was normal", Abedi said.

"We aren't the ones who blow up ourselves among innocents", he said.

"Why was there no outrage for the killing of an Arab and a Muslim in such a cruel way?" she asked.

"Last night the family liaison officers shared [with the families] the fact that intelligence had been leaked and published in The New York Times", Hopkins explained.

After arresting a 23-year-old man on Tuesday, British police said they had taken three more men into custody on Wednesday in south Manchester, where Abedi lived. But leaks from the investigation were creating a trans-Atlantic diplomatic mess.

US President Donald Trump today took up with alacrity a complaint by Britain about leaks of information on the Manchester bombing, wading into a controversy involving The New York Times that has been tormenting the White House with reports on other issues.

President Donald Trump on Thursday described United States intelligence leaks over the Manchester bombing as "deeply troubling" and threatened to prosecute those responsible, after a warning by British Prime Minister Theresa May to keep shared data "secure".

"The alleged leaks coming out of government agencies are deeply troubling". The British are especially angry since the images proved that appeals to stop the leaks - after the identity of the bomber was revealed by the U.S. media first - have not succeeded.

Police also warned late Wednesday of fraudulent online fundraising for the families of the victims, and pointed Twitter users to a legitimate JustGiving page.

Meanwhile, the investigation into the blast widened.

Islamic State, now being driven from territories in Syria and Iraq by Western-backed armed forces, claimed responsibility for the attack.

An emerging portrait of the bomber remained complicated by competing assessments over whether Abedi held views that had sparked concern before the bombing. Libyan media and bloggers reported alleged connections between Abedi and the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), a militant Islamist organisation formed by Libyans who travelled to Afghanistan in the 1980s to fight Soviet troops and later plotted to topple former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. He was picked up while allegedly receiving a money transfer from Salman Abedi.

"Very few people in the community here were close to him, and therefore Salman's fanaticism wasn't something the community was aware of", he said. Abedi's relative said he had spoken with his brother only, asking that his message be relayed to his mother.

Mr Bin Salem said of the final phone call: "He was giving farewell".

"They wouldn't let you share bread with them", she said Abedi told her.

Dagdoug said a network was involved in planning the attack. Davis said it's possible Abedi's father did not know what his son was up to.

Ramadan Abedi, who was detained by a Tripoli counterterrorism force during the interview, said his son Salman had told his family that he was heading on pilgrimage to Mecca.

Around the United Kingdom, many fell silent Thursday for a late-morning minute in tribute to the victims.

In Manchester's St. Ann's Square, where a sea of floral tributes grew by the hour, a crowd sang the hometown band Oasis' song "Don't Look Back in Anger". Queen Elizabeth II visited victims of the attack at Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, telling 14-year-old Evie Mills and her parents: "It's awful. He said don't treat me like a child".

A total of 64 people are being treated in hospital, including 20 in critical care, medical officials said. The National Health Service said 75 people were hospitalized.



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