wnol.info May 30 2017


House repeal of 'Obamacare' hands hot potato to wary Senate

May 30 2017, 07:21 | Irvin Gilbert

A review of an earlier version of the House bill by the Congressional Budget Office estimated 24 million Americans would lose coverage, many by the rollback of the Medicaid program and the phasing-out of billions of dollars states have received to help cover their premiums. The House bill blocks federal payments for a year to the organization, which provides abortions but doesn't use federal funds for them by law. You heard Nancy Pelosi say they're going to end up walking the plank on this and those ads that the Democratic Party is already starting to put together is going to make them glow in the dark.

"They are talking about slashing $800 billion, Chris, from Medicaid coverage". So do you think the Republicans are going to able to pull it off? It is perhaps the best way to understand why the bill cleared the House, and why some version of it could become law. The bill has provoked widespread condemnation as hospital associations, consumers and insurers have said the new proposals would make health care less affordable. The more we find out about TrumpCare, the less we like it. I urge all of you to study the numbers. "I can't go back and cut".

As Republicans crossed over the vote threshold to pass the Bill, Democrats in the House began singing "Na na na na, na na na na, hey hey hey, goodbye", a rowdy suggestion that Republicans will lose seats in the 2018 congressional elections due to their vote. Bean said the healthcare vote signifies positive change.

Almost four months into the era of Trump, Republicans gave tired supporters reason to think there's still hope for the bold promises of Campaign 2016.

"At this point, there seem to be more questions than answers about its consequences", said moderate GOP Sen.

"We are concerned that is more limited under what came from the House", he said. Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff, who is trying to score a special election upset in a traditionally conservative House district, said he strongly opposes "discrimination" over pre-existing conditions in response to the vote. Compliment the people in the House for getting a bill over to the Senate.

Republicans are claiming a triumph by pushing their legislative centerpiece scuttling much of President Barack Obama's health care law through the House. Over at Forbes, I have a detailed writeup of the bill's qualities and flaws.

If you're the sort of person who enjoys the company of other human beings - in the real world or on the internet - then you're already aware that millions of Americans are not only angered by the health care bill's passage in the House, but terrified by what its ratification could mean for them.

But key elements could be ditched by Republican senators, who have said they will start fresh. No new estimate was published prior to Thursday's vote, although one is expected before the Senate considers the bill.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said it was "irresponsible" for Congress to consider legislation that she she said will reduce federal funding for Medicaid.

The House of Representatives voted without analysis from the bipartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO), a move which the former CBO director called a "terrible mistake". The bill's fate is uncertain in the Senate, which is sure to change it. Democrats quickly served notice they would hold Republicans accountable for what they predicted could be a disastrous impact on some of the sickest Americans.



Other news