wnol.info March 28 2017


Readers' Views: Republican health care plan still not affordable

March 28 2017, 07:36 | Irvin Gilbert

How Health Care Is Crippling the Speaker of the House

How Health Care Is Crippling the Speaker of the House

"It's fake news", he said.

Bottom line: When most people in MI and nationally say they want to "repeal and replace" the ACA, they do not necessarily want to lose coverage or return to the pre-ACA world. On Friday, Republican sources told Politico that the American Health Care Act (AHCA) will go the floor of the House next Thursday.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said that the report "actually exceeded my expectations".

The CBO estimated that insurance premiums would rise 15% to 20% in both 2018 and 2019 because fewer healthy people would sign up after the repeal of the Obamacare penalty for declining to obtain insurance. A dramatic example, as reported by Business Insider, concludes that under the new plan the 400 wealthiest households in America get a tax cut of seven million dollars per household per year. Under the Republican bill, her tax credit increases by $1,800. The American Medical Association and American Hospital Association also oppose it.

"There's a number of counties, particularly in the southern and southeastern states, where there's only one carrier offering health plans".

Reed said it was a "result that we anticipated". Like the rest of the country, the majority of Wisconsinites buying private coverage on the marketplace under Obamacare will receive financial help to cover premiums. Earlier this week, he praised the Republican alternative, saying, "It provides tax credits to people to purchase the care that is rightfully theirs".

Four sitting Republican governors have come out against the GOP health care bill. They are the GOP donor base.

He said he believes the Republican plan will insure more people than now insured.

"People who are poorer are more likely to suffer from mental illness", he says.

The bill is now facing criticism from both sides of the aisle, and it's still unclear how the bill might change before it lands on the President's desk. Only two days after the AHCA was unveiled, House Committees were voting on it, before the Congressional Budget Office even had a chance to analyze the bill's projected effect on consumers, health care providers, insurance companies, and the federal budget.

The proposal also benefits the rich, he said, with tax cuts of almost $600 million, including repeals on investment income, among other savings for high income earners.

Republicans leaving a Capitol Hill meeting with House Speaker Paul Ryan and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said the legislation is likely to be changed before it reaches the House floor in order to attract both moderate and conservative party members who are now waffling about their support.



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