wnol.info March 28 2017


Now make a deal to repair the Affordable Care Act?

March 28 2017, 02:17 | Guillermo Bowen

How the GOP Health Plan Would ‘Devastate’ Mentally Ill Addicted GraphicStock

How the GOP Health Plan Would ‘Devastate’ Mentally Ill Addicted                 

     

     GraphicStock

One of the big changes is how it would affect low-income people, seniors, and people with disabilities who get help from Medicaid. "It's fake news", he said.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday stepped up his fight for support on Republicans' plan to dismantle Obamacare, wooing some conservative lawmakers at the White House while legislation advanced toward a possible vote in the House of Representatives next week.

But that is not accurate, said Gerald Friedman, a University of Massachusetts Amherst economics professor and expert on the economics of health care.

The leader of the House Freedom Caucus, whose members want to reduce Medicaid funding and have other objections, said the bill won't pass without even more changes. But interestingly, the Coverage Caucus isn't just moderate Republicans in swing states or districts who are anxious about losing their seats to Democrats (though many of them are represented).

"The most critical element of the [Affordable Care Act] that has expanded coverage is the subsidies that make coverage possible", Lee said.

"Last legislative session there were cuts to pediatric therapies for kids with disabilities enrolled in Medicaid", she says. "That's why these cuts coming down from the ACA repeal bill are very concerning to us". According to CBO, a 64-year-old with earnings equal to 175 percent of the federal poverty line would see their net annual premium costs after tax credits rise from $1,700 per year to $14,600 per year, a 759 percent increase. Fourteen million of those people would come from the Medicaid population.

The proposal also benefits the rich, he said, with tax cuts of almost $600 million, including repeals on investment income, among other savings for high income earners. "It's not the right thing to do for the people". However, the congressman remains on the fence when it comes to the GOP's replacement bill.

And President Trump says "We're going to arbitrate, we're going to all get together, [and] we're going to get something done". By 2020, the federal share of the expansion gradually phases down to 90 percent, with Colorado covering 10 percent.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., touted those figures, telling Fox News' "Special Report with Bret Baier" that the report "actually exceeded my expectations".



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